JOHN RIEWE

Archive for January 2009

Young Jeezy

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My President’s black, My Lambo’s blue

I’ll be g******ed if my rims ain’t too

My money’s light green and my Jordan’s light gray

And they all love to see white, now how much you tryna pay

This is a story about the power of misinformation. I should begin not by translating the the introductory lines (I’ll get to that later), but by directing your attention to the video below wherein rappers Jay-Z and Young Jeezy “articulate” their feelings about Bush and Obama in a highly coarse and to some, a racist manner.  The less streetwise among us may find the two rappers’ words shocking. In fact, a number of rappers have referenced their enthusiasm for Obama since the bginning of his candidacy, and the narrative in general has centered either on Obama’s skin color or the evil supposedly perpetrated by Bush. The catchy lines that lead this story are from Young Jeezy’s “My President” which I first heard in Novemeber. My first reaction was to roll down the windows and crank up the volume in my truck, and jam out to the smooth groove coupled with a tight Dirty South beat. After deciphering the lyrics though I realized Jeezy was a little bit confused.  In traditional English, the lines would read as follows:

My President is Black. My Lamborghini is blue.

I’ll be g******ed if the wheels (on the Lamborghini) aren’t blue as well

My money is light green. My Nike Michael Jordan-labelled apparel is light grey.

Everyone loves to see cocaine. How much are you willing to pay for some?

Doesn’t have the same ring to it, I know. But this is the first sign that Jeezy is likely not well-versed in the intricacies of Obama’s policy initiatives. As I understand it, whether due to record sales or cocaine sales, Young Jeezy is worth well over $250,000, so he can count on a tax hike from his new President. At any rate, Had Jeezy stopped there, he would go down as little more than an ardent supporter of Obama with an affinity for blue automobiles. Instead, he goes down in my book as a misinformed consumer of the narrative promoted by many liberals that Bush stole the 2000 election and has spent the intervening eight years engaing in an orgy of corruption. “Bush robbed all of us, would that make him a criminal?” asks Jeezy. He goes on to describe how he’s “Stuntin on Martin Luther, feelin’ just like a king. Guess this is what he meant when he said he had a dream.”

I trust he was referring to Martin Luther King rather than the 16th century author of the 99 Theses. 

I said at the beginning that this story was about the power of misinformation. I later told that in my opinion Young Jeezy had bought into the far left’s hateful characterization of President Bush. Jeezy’s next step is the key here. By packaging that distorted narrative–which not only makes false claims about President Bush but also focuses on Obama’s skin color as an attribute–into a tasty, consumable morsel packed with Atlanta-bred hip-hop flavor, he propogates or perpetuates incorrect and potentially harmful ideas in the minds of the millions that listen his music. And this is to say nothing of the glamorization of drugs, guns, prostitution, etc. So when O’Reilly derided Young Jeezy and Jay-Z for their tirades, he missed the fact that these ideas have enjoyed wide circulation among hip-hop listeners for a long time. Maybe O’Reilly should put a little more underground rap into rotation on his IPod.

Young Jeezy isn’t a political junkie. He consumes the loudest narrative in the media, and generalizes like most Americans. The problem for conservatives is that the wrong narrative is the loudest. This will not change until we find a way to yell as loud as liberals with superior arguments. Until then, Young Jeezy will continue consuming twisted truths, mixing them in with musical poems of cash, cars, and women and broadcasting hip-hop fans worldwide.

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Written by John Riewe

January 23, 2009 at 5:28 am